A watch-and-wait prostate treatment – STLtoday.com

A watch-and-wait prostate treatment
STLtoday.com
Among other protective foods that he said can stabilize or reduce PSA levels and cancer progression are deeply colored fruits like pomegranates, red grapes, green tea, flaxseed and walnuts. Many men found through PSA testing to have prostate cancer are ...

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Green tea may trim ‘bad’ cholesterol — study – GMANews.TV

GMANews.TV

Green tea may trim 'bad' cholesterol — study
GMANews.TV
"We would really need to have some head-to-head studies comparing the different forms of green tea in order to show which ones work more effectively," Phung said. As for side effects, green tea is considered safe in moderate amounts, though the drink ...

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Green tea may trim "bad" cholesterol: study – Reuters

ThirdAge

Green tea may trim "bad" cholesterol: study
Reuters
"We would really need to have some head-to-head studies comparing the different forms of green tea in order to show which ones work more effectively," Phung said. As for side effects, green tea is considered safe in moderate amounts, though the drink ...
Green tea could lower bad cholesterolTimes of India

Green Tea May Lower "Bad" Cholesterol, New AnalysisMedical News Today
Green tea can reduce bad cholesterolHindustan Times
dailyRx -Press TV -ThirdAge
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Green tea may trim "bad" cholesterol – study – Reuters

Green tea may trim "bad" cholesterol - study
Reuters
"We would really need to have some head-to-head studies comparing the different forms of green tea in order to show which ones work more effectively," Phung said. As for side effects, green tea is considered safe in moderate amounts, though the drink ...

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Drying Herbs: Lemon Balm, Red Perilla, and Spearmint
When the rare October 2011 snowstorm hit a few weeks back, there had not yet been a frost, and I was expecting there to be one, based on weather reports of below-freezing temperatures. The frost never materialized, and there has yet to be a frost in a broad region from Philadelphia southward (although isolated points southward have experienced some light frost).

But in anticipation of the frost, I harvested a bunch of herbs from my neighborhood. I took some of them from plants growing wild on unmaintained property, but much of them I gathered from Tabernacle United Church, with the permission of their gardener, who also informed me that the church used no chemicals on the garden. This picture was taken when the herbs were in the early stage of drying:



In the cold weather, the indoor heat of my apartment quickly dried out these herbs. They are now long-since completely dried and I have been using them to brew herbal teas, and also as ingredients in soups. I want to highlight two things in this post.

The Herbs:

In the lower-left of the photo is lemon balm; I use this herb exclusively for brewing herbal tea, which I drink in quantity. I rarely blend it with actual tea, although I frequently blend it with spearmint and other herbs.

At the top, only partially visible, is spearmint. This particular batch of spearmint, harvested from the church's bed, is exceptionally sweet, producing a totally smooth, candy-like infusion completely devoid of any bitterness or astringency. It's actually not my cup of tea; I prefer the edgier, more bitter or wild-tasting spearmints. But it is good for a change of pace and I imagine that a large number of people might strongly prefer this variety of spearmint.

At the right is red perilla or red shiso, which I wrote about before, on my post on red shiso (perilla) for herbal tea. This batch has a little tougher leaves than the others, and I've found it is a little less enjoyable as a cooked vegetable, but it still produces a delicious herbal infusion.

These herbs all have much fresher, stronger aromas than anything I could order from a catalogue.

The Church, and The Idea:

I want to thank the church and their gardener for giving me permission to harvest these herbs. But more importantly, I want to highlight to everyone the possibility of churches and other organizations growing edible plants on their grounds, and people in the community harvesting these plants. This is a classic example of edible landscaping. On my other blog, I wrote about fruit trees as edible landscaping, but herbs actually make for an easier and quicker option.

If you work with an organization in any capacity related to their grounds or maintenance, I would encourage you to look into edible landscaping, and consider making the plants you grow available to those in the community. You will be providing a valuable asset to the community. Make sure to avoid using any chemicals on your grounds, so that everything is safe to eat.

And if you do not work for any organization in such a capacity, I would encourage you to reach out to organizations when you see edible plants. They may just be going to waste. This is not the first time a church has eagerly given me permission to harvest plants growing in their gardens.

Such arrangements essentially create a free resource; they are one of the most sustainable ways to produce herbs or food, and they also help promote a more sustainable culture by helping people to be more closely connected to the food or herbs that they are consuming.

Have you ever entered into an arrangement like this, on either end of it?
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Green tea shows small effect on cholesterol – Reuters India

Green tea shows small effect on cholesterol
Reuters India
"We would really need to have some head-to-head studies comparing the different forms of green tea in order to show which ones work more effectively," Phung said. There are other questions, too -- including what dose of green tea catechins is "ideal. ...

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Green tea shows small effect on cholesterol – Reuters

Green tea shows small effect on cholesterol
Reuters
"We would really need to have some head-to-head studies comparing the different forms of green tea in order to show which ones work more effectively," Phung said. There are other questions, too -- including what dose of green tea catechins is "ideal. ...

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Tea bowl exhibition in the museum

Is “change” good?  I had this question after I went to a teabowl exhibition at Matsuzakaya Museum (http://www.matsuzakaya.co.jp/nagoya/museum/2011tyawan/index3.html).  The exhibition was about the Japanesedomestic products from origin to contemporary pieces.   Youcan see the history of raku and Mino wares.

Most impressive piece for me was the raku tea bowl named “Kamuro” made byChojiro.  It was very simple and rusticwithout any decorations.  The texture wasearthy and size is smaller than I thought.  I could not imagine how perfectly this bowlfits in the Rikyu’s tea room, Taian.



In the end of the exhibition, there was apanel with a comment from Raku Kichizaemon XV. I don’t remember the exact phrase, but he was saying something like “Teais enjoyed more casually and freely nowadays and will be that way in thefuture. But, there won’t be the spirit of *Rikyu or **Wabi-Sabi there.”   I wasshocked with his warning.  I’ve beenthinking that enjoying tea casually is good thing, but it might not be totallycorrect.  I find his products very distinctive,and I thought he is a kind of person who is trying to create something new orsomething different.  But, he is actuallyworried about our tea culture.   I may need to learn from the past and createnew for the future.

*Rikyu: the most significant tea master inthe history who has perfected The Way of Tea
**wabi-sabi:  Japanese beauty found in simplicity and rusticity.
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Occupy Fredonia gains traction and support – The Leader

Occupy Fredonia gains traction and support
The Leader
Bob Dahlgren, assistant professor of social studies education, has also watched the movement grow. "We started out with I think just three or four students who really started talking about this down at the Green Tea Room," said Dahlgren. ...

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Life in Teacup – Featured Tea Blog
In the past I have reviewed and recommended some tea websites, and today I decided it would be good to review a tea blog. I follow dozens of blogs, and I appreciate every blog that I follow or link to, so a review or feature does not mean that I want to favor one particular blog over another, just that I was thinking about one particular blog at the moment, or have some reason for wanting to share it.

One blog that I often enjoy reading is the Life in Teacup Blog, by Gingko Seto. Life in Teacup is a small tea company, run by Gingko, which specializes in Chinese teas. You can find a number of reviews of their teas, which I find consistently high-quality, on RateTea.net's page of Life in Teacup Reviews. You can also find Gingko Seto on twitter, where she is always eager to engage in tea-related conversation.



About the Life in Teacup Blog:

The Life in Teacup blog is rather atypical among tea blogs. It has long, detailed posts, and often goes into considerable depth. Gingko shows insider knowledge about Chinese tea, and at times, deep research, and there is a lot of unique information in this blog that you cannot easily find elsewhere. But what I most like about this blog is the personal twist or perspective that Gingko puts on the blog. Gingko, like me, is a bit of an experimenter who tends to seek out teas and aspects of tea culture that are novel, unusual, or interesting, while at the same time highly valuing tradition. I find this combination of traits refreshing and rather rare in our society (although more common among tea enthusiasts than the general population).

Although I do subscribe to this blog, it's one of the few blogs where I am less likely to read a post in full when it is posted, and instead, return to it repeatedly when I am researching a specific topic.

For this reason I want to point you to two sections of the blog, based on topics you might be interested in.


  • The Discussion on Long Jing, which is currently in the middle of unfolding, is a serious of posts about Dragon Well / Long Jing, a type of Chinese green tea.

  • Strange, funny, silly and scary teas - This collection of posts is just fun...what can I say?

  • Some of the tags / topics, including oolong tea, and puerh, and the biggest category, chat, for the more chatty / casual / random posts (many of which are still quite informative and deep).



Gingko's Affinity for Mug Brewing:

Lastly, I want to point out one aspect of this blog that I like. Gingko is a big proponent of brewing whole-leaf green tea loose in a glass mug, and I would credit her as being the main source of motivation to get me to experiment with this method, which I think is an under-appreciated method for brewing tea, one often producing very good results. The Life in Teacup blog is full of photographs of a number of different types of green teas being steeped loose in a glass mug. This brewing method really lends itself to photography (and thus, blogging), and I find that you can see the leaf in this method in ways that you can't by any other common brewing method.

So, in summary, if you like Chinese teas, I'd recommend checking out both the Life in Teacup blog, and the store.

Did you know of Gingko and Life in Teacup before this post?

Were you familiar with Gingko's blog, and the Life in Teacup company, before reading this post?
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